Showing posts tagged good reads
etiquetteandethics:

Known Works by Stephen Maturin
Tar-Water Reconsidered
Suggestions for the Amelioration of Sick-Bays
Thoughts on the Prevention of the Diseases most usual among Seamen
New Operation for Suprapubic Cystotomy
Tractatus de Novae Febris Ingressu
an unnamed “paper on boobies”
Remarks on Pezophaps Solitarious
Modest Proposals for the Preservation of Health in the Navy
The Diseases of Seamen
Mariners: Consensus and cohesion in certain states of adversity
Some remarks on Peruvian cirripedes

etiquetteandethics:

Known Works by Stephen Maturin

Tar-Water Reconsidered

Suggestions for the Amelioration of Sick-Bays

Thoughts on the Prevention of the Diseases most usual among Seamen

New Operation for Suprapubic Cystotomy

Tractatus de Novae Febris Ingressu

an unnamed “paper on boobies”

Remarks on Pezophaps Solitarious

Modest Proposals for the Preservation of Health in the Navy

The Diseases of Seamen

Mariners: Consensus and cohesion in certain states of adversity

Some remarks on Peruvian cirripedes

(Reblogged from waxjism)
Towards five o’clock he began to snore, a profound, deliberate, rhythmic sound that filled the cabin. ‘Ah, your soul to the devil, Jack,’ said Stephen, making an ineffectual lunge towards his cot. The snoring continued: Stephen thrust the wax balls deeper into his ears; but no bee had yet made the wax that would keep Captain Aubrey out and presently Stephen left his bed in despair
Patrick O’Brian, The Surgeon’s Mate (via elsinored)
(Reblogged from elsinored)
What a fellow you are, Stephen. Any sailor can tell a great deal from the way another sailor sets his jib, or goes about, or flashes out his stuns’ls, just as you could tell a great deal about a doctor from the way he whipped off a leg.’

‘Always this whipping off of a leg. It is my belief that for you people the whole noble art of medicine is summed up in the whipping off of a leg.
The Mauritius Command by Patrick O’Brian (via ladycashasatiger)
(Reblogged from ladycashasatiger)

Why am I reading this book?

Victor Hugo writes in a style like Neal Stephenson’s - always a new side note that in some way pertains to the larger story.

Our protagonist just ate a meal whose main dish was soup (“made with water, oil, bread, and salt”), some six months after Napoleon left Elba. There was a notable conversation with a man who had been part of the Convention during the Reign of Terror. IDEK, this book.

Reading (and listening to) Les Mis - it’s only 100,000 words longer than A Dance With Dragons. Most important thing so far - imitation lace is a term used for machine-made lace, which was cheaper than handmade.

'Come,' cried Jack, with a sudden inspiration, 'Let us drink to the renewed success of Irish arms, and confusion to the Pope.'
‘The first part ten times over,’ said Stephen, laughing. ‘But never a drop will I drink to the second, Voltairian though I may be. The poor gentlemen has Boney on his hands and that is confusion enough, in all conscience. Besides, he is a very learned Benedictine.’
‘Then confusion to Boney.’
‘Confusion to Boney,’ they said, and drank their glasses dry.
Master and Commander by Patrick O’Brian (via ladycashasatiger)
(Reblogged from ladycashasatiger)
fighting-naturalist:

Stephen stretching his fingers and why it makes many people cry:

One of my favourite aspects of Peter Weir’s adaptation of the Aubreyad into Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World is Weir’s attention to detail, such as this detail here: Stephen stretching his fingers before playing. Like many of the details Weir includes, this one is easy to miss but summarizes important aspects of canon not explicitly included in the film. Unlike the other details, this one makes a lot of people cry when they realize what it means.
If one hasn’t read HMS Surprise, it might be difficult to understand why such a simple gesture causes so much grief to avid followers of the Aubreyad. But noticing this detail will make anyone who got through the third novel in the Aubrey-Maturin series at the very least wince in remembering why Stephen’s fingers are stiffer than they used to be. 
Long story short, Stephen, while on an intelligence mission in Spain, is captured and tortured by the French intelligence at Port Mahon. Even after he is rescued, his time on the rack leaves him with permanent damage to his sinews that leave him nearly incapacitated for the duration of his recovery, and perhaps contribute to his lifelong clumsiness on board ships (although this might just be the result of the fact that he’s the very definition of a landlubber).


And that isn’t even the worst thing that happens to Stephen in that book.
(That movie did such a good job of adding in tidbits for the readers.)

fighting-naturalist:

Stephen stretching his fingers and why it makes many people cry:

One of my favourite aspects of Peter Weir’s adaptation of the Aubreyad into Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World is Weir’s attention to detail, such as this detail here: Stephen stretching his fingers before playing. Like many of the details Weir includes, this one is easy to miss but summarizes important aspects of canon not explicitly included in the film. Unlike the other details, this one makes a lot of people cry when they realize what it means.

If one hasn’t read HMS Surprise, it might be difficult to understand why such a simple gesture causes so much grief to avid followers of the Aubreyad. But noticing this detail will make anyone who got through the third novel in the Aubrey-Maturin series at the very least wince in remembering why Stephen’s fingers are stiffer than they used to be.

Long story short, Stephen, while on an intelligence mission in Spain, is captured and tortured by the French intelligence at Port Mahon. Even after he is rescued, his time on the rack leaves him with permanent damage to his sinews that leave him nearly incapacitated for the duration of his recovery, and perhaps contribute to his lifelong clumsiness on board ships (although this might just be the result of the fact that he’s the very definition of a landlubber).

And that isn’t even the worst thing that happens to Stephen in that book.

(That movie did such a good job of adding in tidbits for the readers.)

(Reblogged from hellotailor)
'Oh, fuck the immemorial custom of the service,' cried the Admiral: and then, appalled at his own words, he fell silent for a while.
The Fortune of War (via fuckyeahnaturalphilosophy)
(Reblogged from fuckyeahnaturalphilosophy)

In other news I have the 3rd Bridget Jones book, sitting on my stairs, waiting for me to read it.

englandsdreaming:

Wives & Daughters ► Episode 2

∟ “No, I shan’t, and if I’m to kill myself as it were trying to think and behave as other people want me to I feel I might as well never have lived. And as for the happiness you speak of, well I shall never be happy again!”

(Reblogged from harrietvane)